News

From Ireland and Michigan, a Funeral Director Echoes Poetic Insights of Heaney and O'Driscoll

Author: Bill Schmitt

Thomas P. Lynch, a poet and funeral director with roots in Ireland and Michigan, combined reflections on life and death with tributes to two recently deceased Irish poets when he spoke at Notre Dame on September 9, 2016. The occasion was the Cushwa Center’s annual Hibernian Lecture, focused this year on the genius of Seamus Heaney and Dennis O’Driscoll, considered from Lynch’s distinct perspective as an Irish-American writer who deals professionally with death and dying. He honored the two masters of multiple genres, who died in 2013 and 2012 respectively, by recalling their inspiration for his own writing.…

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Cushwa Center Director Cummings to Lead Catholic Historian Group

Author: Bill Schmitt

Kathleen Sprows Cummings, director of Notre Dame’s Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, begins her term on Jan. 6 as president of the American Catholic Historical Association for 2017. Cummings, an associate professor of American studies and history, rose to the leadership position during the association’s annual conference in Denver.…

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Race, Celibacy, and Religion in the 19th Century: A Conversation with Alexandria Griffin

Author: Bill Schmitt

Alexandria Griffin, a Ph.D. candidate at Arizona State University, received a 2016 research travel grant to utilize Notre Dame’s University Archives in probing “intersections of race, gender, and celibacy.” Her dissertation proposal aimed to illuminate the experiences of African American communities of Catholic priests and nuns—and of African American Shakers—during the 19th century. Heather Grennan Gary, the Cushwa Center’s communications and outreach specialist, interviewed Griffin about her on-campus research in May 2016. This inquiry, Griffin explained, could provide new insights into African American perceptions of particular, prescribed religious traditions.…

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Grant Recipient Foregrounds Catholic Women's History in "Transnational" Activism

Author: Bill Schmitt

Stephen Andes, an assistant professor of history at Louisiana State University and author of The Vatican and Catholic Activism in Mexico and Chile: The Politics of Transnational Catholicism, 1920–1940, received a Cushwa Center research travel grant to utilize Notre Dame’s University Archives in early October 2016. He supplemented his previous international research with unique insights into Mexican Catholic Action and U.S. perspectives to advance his work on a project titled “Catholic Vagabond: The Transnational Life and Times of Sofia del Valle.” His visit to Notre Dame enriched his biography of Sofia del Valle, whose life illuminates the early phases of Latin American Catholic women’s activism. Andes explores in her story various aspects of gender, race, lay Catholicism, Church history, and broader historical trends from a transnational perspective.…

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Notre Dame Gains Scholarly Resources for Black Catholic History Month and Beyond

Author: Bill Schmitt

African American Catholics are the focus of Black Catholic History Month, celebrated every November. This year’s focus has been extended and energized at Notre Dame as the University prepares major new resources for ongoing studies of religious experiences and social contexts highlighted during this month.…

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Call for Papers: North Atlantic Catholic Communities in Rome, 1622-1939

Author: Heather Gary

The Cushwa Center invites interested scholars to submit proposals for papers dealing with any aspect of the presence in the Eternal City of individuals as well as communities originating from present-day England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, English- and French-speaking Canada, and the United States.

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In new book, Arts and Letters dean reveals Jesuits’ impact on global history

Author: Josh Weinhold

Mcgreevy Book2

In his new book, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton University Press), McGreevy uses those individual religious experiences and others as a gateway to a larger narrative. The book traces how the religious order grew from 600 men in 1814 to roughly 17,000 men a century later. McGreevy argues that their odyssey of expulsion (by European nationalists worried about excessive Jesuit loyalty to the papacy) and reconstruction (as Jesuits launched a counterculture centered around parishes, schools, and universities) powerfully shaped modern history.

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An interview with Rebecca Berru Davis

Author: Heather Gary

Rebecca Berru DavisDavis

Rebecca Berru Davis is one of nearly 50 scholars presenting research at the upcoming Conference on the History of Women Religious (HWR), a triennial gathering that runs from June 26-29 at Santa Clara University. Davis studies women artists of the early Liturgical Movement in the United States, from 1932 to 1962. She just completed two years at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, where she was a Louisville Institute Postdoctoral Fellow. At HWR she will present a talk about Sister Helene O’Connor, O.P., titled “Liturgical Art: An Apostolate and Pedagogy For Artists and Educators.” She recently spoke with Heather Grennan Gary about her work.…

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