News » Archives » 2016

Race, Celibacy, and Religion in the 19th Century: A Conversation with Alexandria Griffin

Author: Bill Schmitt

Alexandria Griffin, a Ph.D. candidate at Arizona State University, received a 2016 research travel grant to utilize Notre Dame’s University Archives in probing “intersections of race, gender, and celibacy.” Her dissertation proposal aimed to illuminate the experiences of African American communities of Catholic priests and nuns—and of African American Shakers—during the 19th century. Heather Grennan Gary, the Cushwa Center’s communications and outreach specialist, interviewed Griffin about her on-campus research in May 2016. This inquiry, Griffin explained, could provide new insights into African American perceptions of particular, prescribed religious traditions.…

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Grant Recipient Foregrounds Catholic Women's History in "Transnational" Activism

Author: Bill Schmitt

Stephen Andes, an assistant professor of history at Louisiana State University and author of The Vatican and Catholic Activism in Mexico and Chile: The Politics of Transnational Catholicism, 1920–1940, received a Cushwa Center research travel grant to utilize Notre Dame’s University Archives in early October 2016. He supplemented his previous international research with unique insights into Mexican Catholic Action and U.S. perspectives to advance his work on a project titled “Catholic Vagabond: The Transnational Life and Times of Sofia del Valle.” His visit to Notre Dame enriched his biography of Sofia del Valle, whose life illuminates the early phases of Latin American Catholic women’s activism. Andes explores in her story various aspects of gender, race, lay Catholicism, Church history, and broader historical trends from a transnational perspective.…

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Notre Dame Gains Scholarly Resources for Black Catholic History Month and Beyond

Author: Bill Schmitt

African American Catholics are the focus of Black Catholic History Month, celebrated every November. This year’s focus has been extended and energized at Notre Dame as the University prepares major new resources for ongoing studies of religious experiences and social contexts highlighted during this month.…

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Call for Papers: North Atlantic Catholic Communities in Rome, 1622-1939

Author: Heather Gary

The Cushwa Center invites interested scholars to submit proposals for papers dealing with any aspect of the presence in the Eternal City of individuals as well as communities originating from present-day England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, English- and French-speaking Canada, and the United States.

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In new book, Arts and Letters dean reveals Jesuits’ impact on global history

Author: Josh Weinhold

In his new book, American Jesuits and the World: How an Embattled Religious Order Made Modern Catholicism Global (Princeton University Press), McGreevy uses those individual religious experiences and others as a gateway to a larger narrative. The book traces how the religious order grew from 600 men in 1814 to roughly 17,000 men a century later. McGreevy argues that their odyssey of expulsion (by European nationalists worried about excessive Jesuit loyalty to the papacy) and reconstruction (as Jesuits launched a counterculture centered around parishes, schools, and universities) powerfully shaped modern history.

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An interview with Rebecca Berru Davis

Author: Heather Gary

Davis Rebecca Berru Davis is one of nearly 50 scholars presenting research at the upcoming Conference on the History of Women Religious (HWR), a triennial gathering that runs from June 26-29 at Santa Clara University. Davis studies women artists of the early Liturgical Movement in the United States, from 1932 to 1962. She just completed two years at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, where she was a Louisville Institute Postdoctoral Fellow. At HWR she will present a talk about Sister Helene O’Connor, O.P., titled “Liturgical Art: An Apostolate and Pedagogy For Artists and Educators.” She recently spoke with Heather Grennan Gary about her work.…

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New Hesburgh Research Travel Grant program names first five recipients

Author: Heather Gary

The Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism has named five inaugural recipients of the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Research Travel Grant program, a initiative created to support projects that consider the legacy of Father Hesburgh, late president emeritus of the University of Notre Dame.    

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Seminar in American Religion explores Mark Noll's book on the Bible and early American life

Author: Heather Gary

On April 16, 2016, more than 80 participants gathered at the Morris Inn for the Seminar in American Religion. The topic of this semester’s Seminar was Mark Noll’s In the Beginning Was the Word: The Bible in American Public Life, 1492–1783 (Oxford University Press, 2015). Noll, a longtime friend and collaborator of the Cushwa Center, served as the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame before retiring in May 2016. He has authored, edited, or co-edited over 50 books, including America’s God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln…

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Lecture on Irish missionary sisters highlights the links that fostered a distinctive Irish Catholicism around the globe

Author: Heather Gary

On March 29, Colin Barr presented a lecture on the global networks that connected Irish Catholic missionary sisters in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Barr’s lecture was based on research for his forthcoming book, Ireland’s Empire, which examines how missionaries from Erin fostered a distinctive “Hiberno-Roman” Catholic identity in the English-speaking world.

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Call for Papers: “Too Small a World”: Catholic Sisters as Global Missionaries

Author: Heather Gary

The Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism and the Conference on the History of Women Religious are pleased to announce an upcoming international symposium, “'Too Small a World': Catholic Sisters as Global Missionaries" scheduled for April 6-8, 2017, at the University of Notre Dame. …

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Q&A with Jennifer Callaghan on language in the liturgy after Vatican II

Author: Heather Gary

Jennifer Callaghan is a doctoral candidate in religious studies at Northwestern University. She received a 2015 Research Travel Grant from the Cushwa Center to support archival research for her dissertation, “Critical Mass: The Fall and Rise of Latin in the Long U.S. Catholic Liturgical Moment.”

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Interview with Will Kurtz, author of new book on Catholics and the Civil War

Author: Heather Gary

William B. Kurtz is digital historian and archivist at the John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History at the University of Virginia. His first book, Excommunicated from the Union: How the Civil War Created a Separate Catholic America, was published in 2015 by Fordham University Press. 

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Forthcoming book tells the story of Irish-Americans' role in Ireland's Easter Rising of 1916

Author: Heather Gary

Robert Schmuhl is the Walter H. Annenberg-Edmund P. Joyce Professor of American Studies and Journalism at the University of Notre Dame. He received the 2014 Hibernian Research Award in support of his forthcoming book, Ireland’s Exiled Children: America and the Easter Rising, which will be released by Oxford University Press next month, just in time to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Easter Rising of 1916.

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